Songwriting 101: Lovedrug

Today I’ll be going over a song I wrote a couple years ago titled Lovedrug. This particular piece is a great example of how simplicity in songwriting can be effective. It uses the popular I, IV, V, vi chords which I previously discussed here. If you haven’t already, I recommend reading that article first in order to get a better understanding of chord relationships and why these chords work so well together. Let’s jump right in!

Lovedrug is in D# Major and is divided into two main sections using the following chords:

Verse: D# Major (I) – A# Major (V) – C Minor (vi) – G# Major (IV)

Chorus: D# Major (I) – C Minor (vi)

These chords can be very tricky to play on guitar, but there’s something we can do to make it more straightforward. We can place a capo on the 8th fret which allows us to play these chords in the open position. This makes the song easier to play because it allows us to use basic chord shapes. In practice, you could then use the following shapes:

Verse: G Major – D Major – E Minor – C Major

Chorus: G Major – E Minor

For those that are unfamiliar, these shapes look like this:

chordprogression2

 

 

 

Something to note is that we can easily transcribe songs to a different key while still using these same chord shapes by simply moving the capo up or down the neck. The reason I chose to use the key of D# Major (8th fret capo) for this particular song was because it was the best fit for my vocals. It’s often a good practice to experiment with your songs in different keys. While inexperienced singers may be limited with the keys they can use, it can provide a great deal of flexibility and even new ideas for how singers can perform the melody.  For Lovedrug I also experimented with using G Major and A# Major throughout the songwriting process.

Next let’s look at the song structure. I would categorize this song as ABABCBBC. Looking at each letter: A represents the verse, B represents the chorus, and C represents the bridge. My favorite part of Lovedrug was the chorus because the melody was particularly catchy, and therefore I wanted to emphasize this part of the song. To do this, I simply made it the most prominent part by repeating it four times in total. The only difference between the bridge and the verse is that the bridge uses a guitar riff instead of the verse melody.

Finally let’s take a look at the lyrics and melody:

I love to watch you squirm
Every time you lie
Feel the way it hurts

You get me high then you bring me down
Don’t know why I ever stick around
Hate to say, hate to say it now
Just a drug, just a drug, just a drug to me

Why did the fire die?
I want to watch it burn
Every single time

You get me high then you bring me down
Don’t know why I ever stick around
Hate to say, hate to say it now
Just a drug, just a drug, just a drug to me

The song is about an addiction to an unhealthy relationship. It highlights how we irrationally glorify the honeymoon phase with a partner and use it to justify lies and bad behavior. The lyrics are simple and easy to understand, but often times that’s exactly what a song needs to demonstrate its message clearly. I think I can accomplished that with this song.

For the melody I started with the simple idea of walking up a scale for the word “high” and walking down the same scale for the word “down.” After trying several variations I finally came up with the one I liked most. From there, I made several iterations of it and eventually picked one that ended up being the verse melody. Melody writing is often just coming up with 20 different ways to sing a single word- and then ultimately picking your favorite and expanding it.

Well that about wraps up Lovedrug. If you take anything away from this lesson I hope it’s that simplicity can do wonders with the right touch. It’s something you should always consider during the songwriting process because you may regretfully add too much. Thanks for reading.

The Case for Universal Basic Income

Universal Basic Income (UBI) is the idea that all citizens of a country should regularly receive an unconditional sum of money in order to pay for basic living necessities. In practice, UBI would replace the current welfare system and it’s numerous existing programs as a more transparent, efficient, and affordable alternative. UBI would ultimately eradicate poverty and prepare us for the future economy that is rapidly changing due to technological process and automation. Let’s take a closer look on how UBI could work in the American economy.

In America, the poverty line for a single individual is $11,880. Thus if UBI were to provide every citizen between the age of (18-64) with $12,000 a year, it would instantly bring every citizen above the poverty line. This will allow a couple things to happen. First the need for a minimum wage law would become unnecessary because it would no longer have to provide a basic living, and therefore involuntary unemployment would no longer exist. Competition would thrive and people would be more willing to take risks knowing they’ll always have $1000 in the bank every month.

Secondly, women would be reinvigorated into the economy. Women disproportionately provide the majority of care taking roles in families for children and elderly which is work that is monetarily uncompensated for. UBI would thus be a transfer of wealth to care takers (and therefore mostly women) and provide them with compensation for work that they already do for free. Indeed, UBI would be the biggest feminist revolutionary act of our time.

While the economic boom that UBI is capable of providing looks promising, some skeptics have challenged it on several fronts. One criticism of UBI is that by providing people with free money is that people will have much less incentive to work. This is a fair criticism, but it is one that can be addressed by changing the tax system to a more progressive one.

In the current welfare system, benefits are phased out as workers earnings increase. This creates poor incentive to work, and in some cases like those with disability insurance, the choice is binary: work or receive benefits. With UBI, workers will only stand to gain from working and educating themselves to fit the needs of future markets.

Another strong criticism of UBI is it’s relationship with families that have a lot of children. Should UBI provide more for these families? Is this fair? And perhaps more importantly: Is this economically sustainable? This is a problem directly related to overpopulation. You can read more about this in my blog post Overpopulation: A Road to Dystopia. As far as I can tell, UBI advocates haven’t been entirely convincing on this front. However, some argue that this will be a non-issue.

UBI will require a change of mindset in the way we view work in our everyday lives. It will require us to accept the uncharted territories of a new world that has an abundance of resources, massive automation, and a diminishing need for traditional work. Despite the challenge this presents, I’m incredibly optimistic to the implementation of UBI in the near future (25-40 years) here in America. I expect this conversation to elevate onto the national level in the coming years.

For further reading on arguments for and against UBI, some recommended articles:

A Guaranteed Income For Every American

The Case for Free Money

My Second Thoughts About Universal Basic Income

Why a Universal Basic Income Is a Terrible Idea

If Robots Steal Out Jobs, A Universal Basic Income Could Help